Today designers have all sorts of software tools to help them delineate their ideas accurately. These days the challenge seems to be how to keep up with all

the updates and changes to Revit, but for a minute let’s go back in time to the 1760’s and consider how draftsmen solved these complicated problems without the use of computer software and programs. We really need to pay homage to the French mathematician, Gaspard Monge, who is considered the “Father of Descriptive Geometry.” For it was Gaspard Monge who first theorized and calculated how to accurately use cutting planes and transform two-dimensional images, unlocking the ability to model and delineate objects three-dimensionally.

For some, this may not sound like really exciting stuff but keep in mind that this was the first time through applicable math and science that we could accurately calculate and show the true length of any line in any particular view. So the next time you have a Revit issue just remember the mathematical pioneer who got us to this point.

 

 


Tony Perpignano, AIA- President
With more than 30 years of experience in principal management, architectural design, administration, and planning, Tony has the expertise on project types of all scales and sizes. He’s had a hand in designing many of CWG’s signature structures, but he particularly enjoys designing public schools. Tony has a passion for community service and is an active member of Rotary Club and the Helena Chamber of Commerce.